Leveraging the Many, Many Learning Resources of Lynda.com

That's a lot of search results for Excel!

I was having a conversation yesterday with a colleague about ways to market William & Mary’s institutional subscription to Lynda.com.  Lynda.com, a subsidiary of business-focused social networking site LinkedIn, is a compendium of tutorial videos which range from quick one-offs to entire multi-hour courses. The site is focused on technical, creative, and business skills, and amounts […]

A Brief Guide to Basic Technology Planning for Oral History Projects

Using audio only.

Over the past few months, I’ve been working with some folks on planning an oral history project. In doing that planning, I realized that there are many decisions to make about technology before even embarking on any of the interviews themselves. Whether your oral history project is one that you are doing yourself for your […]

Video Conferencing and Collaboration at W&M: A Follow Up

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A little more than a year ago, I wrote a post about the history of, the many uses for, and the potential good that video conferencing and collaboration can produce in the academic environment. Shortly there after, my good friend and colleague, John Drummond, published a post about many of the technology solutions we have […]

Video Rising: The Way the Media Wind is Blowing

Wind Turbines in rural Missouri

Sometimes you get little hits of something on the wind, and it makes you wonder if it means a change in the weather. To wit: A lunchtime conversation with IT colleagues where it’s mentioned that the lion’s share of network traffic in the evening at the College is from Netflix. An anecdote by a professor […]

Engaging Students with Frontline and TED Talks

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I once asked my 11th grade Math Analysis teacher how it was conceptually possible to take the limit of something as it approached infinity if infinity has no limit. She told me that I didn’t need to understand it conceptually, I only needed to be able to work the formula. So I did what she […]

Adventures in Tech: Video Hosting with WMApps

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It’s always nice to discover something that you need right in your own backyard.  I was poking around the Web and on the same day found out that there was a product called “Google Video for Education” and that the product was discontinued. Why discontinue such a valuable and needed service? Well, I found that […]

Multimedia Content in Blackboard

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From filmstrips to field trips, enhanced classes are more fun than a plain lecture format. As you plan for Fall you’re probably thinking about incorporating media to wow your students. Blackboard allows you to add a variety of multimedia content. From the Content section of your course you can upload audio, image, or video files. That’s handy if you’ve recorded a lecture podcast style or if you’d like to upload a video from your computer. You can also add multimedia from the Web, and in this post I’ll show you how.

Secure Digital Media? Forgeddaboudit.

Are guys like this trying to get at your digital media when you don't want them to?

Once your media is on a screen you don’t control, you don’t control it anymore! So what do you do with your video and audio files you want to share but still want to keep secure, that is, prevent someone else from downloading?

Wanna Hangout? Google Hangouts in Education

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We’ve been hanging out quite a bit recently in the School of Education. Google Hangout enables users to conduct free Web-based video calls for up to ten participants. Hangout is a feature of Google+ (the Google version of Facebook). All William & Mary students have access to Google+ and Google Hangout through their free WMApps accounts.

Photography is Dead, Long Live Photography

Eduard Muybridge

Since the beginning, photography (ca. 1837) has had a bit of an identity crisis — is it an art, a science, or just merely a documentary tool? Until recently photography had been in a large part limited by what could be photographed by the available technology. But now, with the advent of photo sharing and Instagram, photography just may be dead (or mostly dead as it were).