Study Abroad Technology Tips Part One, Preparing for Your Trip

Smartphone-2

Here’s the first installment of technology tips for leading study abroad courses. For this first post in the series on study abroad technology tips, we’ll begin with before you leave for your trip. Imagine that it’s about two weeks before your trip, and you know that you need to get ready for documenting your adventures […]

Revisiting OpenVA 2014 — Bringing the Conversation to W&M

Following up on my post from October, I’d like to take the opportunity to reflect upon the topics discussed at the OpenVA 2014 meeting, how they reflect some emerging trends in academic technology, and plans to host an OpenVA event here at W&M. The meeting was hosted by Tidewater Community College (TCC) at their Virginia […]

A Brief Guide to Basic Technology Planning for Oral History Projects

Using audio only.

Over the past few months, I’ve been working with some folks on planning an oral history project. In doing that planning, I realized that there are many decisions to make about technology before even embarking on any of the interviews themselves. Whether your oral history project is one that you are doing yourself for your […]

Opening up the Web for Students and Faculty

Domain

Last fall, our neighbors just two and a half hours to the north at the University of Mary Washington launched an eye-opening program for their students, faculty, and staff. It is a service to allow users to register an Internet domain and house it on internal servers, called A Domain of One’s Own. The name […]

Tips for Managing Laptops in the Classroom

Students looking very attentive to their work in the pre-laptop era.

News flash: Student laptops and phones can be annoying in the college classroom. Old news, right? But still news that instructors have to deal with more and more. We can ban devices, allow them, or figure out something in between — there’s no shortage of advice and policies in managing their use. Over the past […]

SCORM und Drang, or, Testing out Some E-Learning “Objects”

This is not a SCORM, but it does do a good job saving student answers. The pencil and paper method, however, cannot grade exams for you.

The other week I was thinking about little projects to test out on the e-learning development kits, and I hit upon the idea of teaching myself how to create interactive content in Camtasia Studio. After watching the how-to video on Camtasia’s website (go figure — most of the help for Camtasia is developed in Camtasia, […]

Why I Want My Kid to Study at William & Mary and Why I’m Eager for the New COLL Curriculum

wren-building

  Okay, so that’s a strange, non-tech title for an article on an academic technology website, but the College’s new COLL curriculum has been much on my mind lately as I and my colleagues in Academic Information Systems work to come up with creative solutions to help our faculty members implement many of their plans […]

Video Rising: The Way the Media Wind is Blowing

Wind Turbines in rural Missouri

Sometimes you get little hits of something on the wind, and it makes you wonder if it means a change in the weather. To wit: A lunchtime conversation with IT colleagues where it’s mentioned that the lion’s share of network traffic in the evening at the College is from Netflix. An anecdote by a professor […]

Learning Objectives First, Technology Second

The stages of backward design.

[This is a guest post by Sharon Zuber, Visiting Assistant Professor of English and Film Studies and Director of the Writing Resources Center at William & Mary] What comes to mind when most faculty think about “IT” services? The person who rescues a crashed hard drive? The voice behind the HELP number when a classroom […]

The One-Minute Dissertation

2013-11-26_12-08-45

While most of the media attention has focused on Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and their impact on teaching, it seems to me that our current approach to research is likely to change even more dramatically — particularly the doctoral dissertation in education. The dissertation in the social sciences is a relatively predictable document that has been developed according to the expectations over the last 50 years or so. The chapters cover the same topics and follow the same logic, even though we no longer hand-calculate our statistical tests or tediously calculate the amount of space needed to accommodate our footnotes at the bottom of a typewriter page. But the dissertation still takes a year to produce, and the first couple of drafts are painful for the writer and for the advisor. What would happen if the dissertation could be written in one minute?