How to Effectively Use Blogging in Your Course

Title: Blogging Street Cred
Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/wakingtiger/3156791845/

If you have read any or all of my previous posts, you may have picked up on the fact that I tend to stray a bit from the typical Academic Technology Blog contribution tactic that many of my colleagues take. Sometimes I still find myself seeking to take the student role here at the College, […]

Basic Skills for the Information Age: Ideas from the Community College Circuit

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In April, I attended the Council for the Study of Community Colleges’ annual meeting in Washington, D.C. Part of my work there involved co-organizing a roundtable session around the idea of digital literacies in community colleges. Since then, I have published a summary of the session here. Defining Digital Literacy One of our biggest challenges […]

SCORM und Drang, or, Testing out Some E-Learning “Objects”

This is not a SCORM, but it does do a good job saving student answers. The pencil and paper method, however, cannot grade exams for you.

The other week I was thinking about little projects to test out on the e-learning development kits, and I hit upon the idea of teaching myself how to create interactive content in Camtasia Studio. After watching the how-to video on Camtasia’s website (go figure — most of the help for Camtasia is developed in Camtasia, […]

Reflections on W&M’s myNotebook Program Ten Years Later

Geology 110 students using their laptop computers and LectureTools during class. I’m arm-waving at the front of the class. So who is on Facebook and who is checking their email? Photo by Pablo Yanez.

William & Mary announced its myNotebook initiative nearly ten years ago. Our effort was by no means revolutionary (as Wake Forest University’s ThinkPad Project began a decade earlier in 1996), rather it was meant to capitalize on the boom of mobile computing that was already changing how students interacted with technology on a day to […]

Climbing Everest in the Classroom with Simulation-Based Learning

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In my time here at the College, I have been dabbling in a few of the Mason School of Business MBA classes that are available. It was there that I had my first experience with the game simulation-based learning tool known as Everest; developed and distributed by Forio. The experience was exciting, meaningful, and extremely […]

The Most Successful Online Discussion Board — a Case Study

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This post outlines how Professor Tom Ward in the School of Education used a discussion board activity with a midterm project to facilitate critical thinking, peer coaching, and the authentic application of conceptual knowledge in a doctoral level Advanced Statistics course.

Good-Bye (or is it See You Later?) from Gene Roche

This will be my last post to this blog as part of my administrative positions at William & Mary. At some point early in August, I’ll be ending more than 30 years as a college administrator and moving to a full-time faculty position in the Higher Education Program in the School of Education. Even after […]

“Communities of Inquiry”: The Anti-MOOCs

Community of Inquiry Model

Conversations about e-learning at William & Mary are on the rise. Rachel, Jamison, and I have been working with two Arts & Sciences faculty who are in the process of developing the College’s first two fully online courses (to be taught during summer session). Faculty in graduate programs in business and education have been discussing the […]

Second Annual W&M Teaching & Technology Expo

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The second annual W&M Teaching & Technology Expo is just around the corner! Last year’s open-house showcase of educational technologies was a huge success, so come join us for this year’s event! All W&M faculty and staff are invited to join us again this year for an exciting opportunity to connect with faculty and technical […]

Blended Learning Courses Challenge Teachers to Shift Thinking from What They Do to What Students Do

Old classroom structures are one thing that provides a challenge to the instructor of a blended course.

Over the last few months, my energies have been focused on developing courses from a variety of perspectives, and the classes that I’m working with are core courses that are taught in every MBA or EdD program. The content and skills that we expect from students are widely understood, and there are lots of texts and other materials available that provide content and structure for “the material.” Many of us involved in “blending” these kinds of courses believe that they have huge potential for individualizing instruction and providing new paths to deeper, more involved learning.