More on Web-Friendly Mapping: Google Maps vs. Google Sheets

old-world-map

In my last post I discussed some of the new features and cool possibilities of Google Maps for the humanities at the College. After writing that post, I’ve been obsessing just a bit on the various Web-friendly ways to present map data to an academic community, and I’ve struck on another interesting option in case Google Maps […]

Project Ideas for Google Maps and the Humanities

WM-google-maps

Google Maps’s newest iteration attempts to combine qualitative and quantitative data into easy to build and manipulate maps. While faculty and students in the sciences and social sciences have been using quantitative data sets in teaching and research for a long time, the impulse to use interactive maps has not quite caught on with too […]

Pictures Worth Worlds of Data — Geospatial Data Visualization Projects

earth-visualization

For a while now I’ve been very interested in data visualization — specifically how visualization can be used to gain understanding of really large data sets. Actually that’s not true. Like most people I’ve always been drawn to data visualization, if for no other reason that we humans are really quite bad at gaining any […]

Easier Online Maps with CartoDB

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For the recent Teaching & Technology Expo, I was asked to host the ESRI ArcGIS table to introduce W&M faculty and staff to how they can incorporate GIS mapping into their courses, research, and work. As I prepared for the event, I struggled with how to present basic approaches that non-GIS savvy individuals could actually […]

Sizing Up the Rocks – GigaPan Imagery in the Geology Classroom

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[This is a guest post by Professor Chuck Bailey of W&M’s Geology Department.] The rocky crust of the Earth provides a tangible puzzle for geologists to solve. I teach a second-level geology course entitled Earth Structure & Dynamics and one goal of the class is to develop students’ skills at reading the rock record. To […]

Worlds, Great and Small: Using Ultra-High-Definition Interactive Images in the Classroom

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I recall when I was learning to drive, and how I foolishly thought I knew where I was going. How could I not know where I was going? After all, I had spent countless hours looking out the car window as my parents ferried me around suburban Maryland and Washington DC. Once I had my […]

“W&M Mapping our World” Internationalization Grant

Academic Information Services, in coordination with the Reves Center for International Studies and the International Advisory Committee (IAC) invites faculty members to submit applications for our “William & Mary Mapping our World” Internationalization Grant. The purpose of the award is to foster student research abroad and to provide an online showcase for that research. Special emphasis will be placed on research projects with a multimedia component.

The Goldilocks Effect: Choices for Academic Technology Mapping Projects

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So Pablo and I are working on an exciting new project — devoted to student research abroad–which is heavily dependent on being able to include an embedded interactive multimedia Web map. (You can look at the project here: W&M Global Mapping, but it isn’t ready for prime time as of this writing, so depending on when you visit the site, you may get crazy results. We’re hoping to have the site fully armed and operational by summer 2013.)

Rescued by Technology

St. Petersburg Map

Google Maps can do more that just provide a venue for student assignments while abroad. Read about how Mike used Google Maps to help a lost student in St. Petersburg, Russia!

Imagination, Interiors, and User Interfaces (Spatial Turn Series)

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Designers, writers, and developers have the challenge of finding the right balance of interaction among sources, interface, and user, and “virtual tours” are no different. My favorite digital humanities projects are those that get this balance right. They draw me in and allow my imagination to go anywhere. By looking at three examples of virtual tours, we can start to see the ways in which sources, interface and users interact to produce moments of interest and imagination.