A Trip to Fredericksburg: the DTLT in the ITCC at the UMW

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This summer a small group from W&M had the distinct pleasure of taking a short jaunt up the road to visit with our colleagues in the University of Mary Washington (UMW) Division of Teaching and Learning Technologies (DTLT). I’ve posted about the work going on up there before, and after working with director Jim Groom […]

Integrating Technology Needs with Classroom Design, My Current A/V Adventure

Schenectady, New York. A section of a blueprint reading class at the Onieda School, 1943

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/fsa.8d20063/

I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about audiovisual technology these days. We’ve been going through some changes in Academic Information Services, most notably the retirements of director Gene Roche and Classroom Support manager Myron Hall. As Chaucer might say, however, time, tide, and building construction wait for no one. As the construction of […]

Video Conferencing and Collaboration at W&M: A Follow Up

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A little more than a year ago, I wrote a post about the history of, the many uses for, and the potential good that video conferencing and collaboration can produce in the academic environment. Shortly there after, my good friend and colleague, John Drummond, published a post about many of the technology solutions we have […]

Reflections on a Fireside Chat: “Managing” Versus “Teaching” the Online Course

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This past weekend, I had an interesting conversation about e-learning while sitting on a mountaintop, huddled around a campfire in the dark. (I promise, dear reader, that I won’t try to make a metaphor out of that.) I was having this conversation with an old friend from my undergraduate days who teaches history at a […]

Reflections on W&M’s myNotebook Program Ten Years Later

Geology 110 students using their laptop computers and LectureTools during class. I’m arm-waving at the front of the class. So who is on Facebook and who is checking their email? Photo by Pablo Yanez.

William & Mary announced its myNotebook initiative nearly ten years ago. Our effort was by no means revolutionary (as Wake Forest University’s ThinkPad Project began a decade earlier in 1996), rather it was meant to capitalize on the boom of mobile computing that was already changing how students interacted with technology on a day to […]

E-Learning “Kit in a Box” for Faculty

John Drummond working on eLearning kit prototype

Gene Roche’s recent article on blended or “flipped” learning frames the significant challenge involved in creating engaging blended learning activities in the classroom. One of my primary roles is working on the other side of that coin — bringing together the nuts, bolts, and infrastructure necessary to produce academic content using technology. As interest and […]

Blackboard, Yea or Nay? Join the LMS Search Committee to Decide

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William & Mary chose Blackboard as our learning management system (LMS) in 1999.  Our senior students graduating in 2014 were in kindergarten.  MySpace ruled social media and YouTube didn’t exist.  DVDs were still fairly new and iPods weren’t even in development yet. That first version of Blackboard looked a lot different from the version we […]

Adventures in Tech: Sharing an iPad in a Video Teleconference

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I was worried at first when asked to research the problem: how to share the screen of an Apple iPad within an Adobe Connect meeting. Screen sharing using an app is not just unavailable, but prevented by the iPad’s basic design. But then I had a glimmer of an idea, and thus of hope: AirPlay.

W&M Rich Media Grant Program Wrap-Up

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With the Fall Semester behind us now, we’re happy to say that we’ve seen the completion of over a dozen successful Rich Media Grant Projects here at W&M, and we’d like to share what we’ve seen as faculty wrapped up their projects.

The Origins and Drawbacks of CMS-Based Student Projects

Nothing says 1990s Internet like Netscape!

As an undergrad at W&M in 2002, I completed my first website for an assignment in an American Studies class. Ten years later, the Web has changed, but I am not so sure if I can say the same for many classroom Web projects. Publishing content on the Web is far easier today than it used to be, thanks to a category of Web applications called Content Management Systems (CMS). A CMS allows people to publish content to the Web without much technical skill. This is great because it allows class projects to focus more on writing and Web publishing. However, I wonder if we have lost something in Web projects as CMSs like WordPress have become more prevalent. I think it is time to reevaluate what a semester-long Web project should look like.