Video Conferencing and Collaboration at W&M: A Follow Up

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A little more than a year ago, I wrote a post about the history of, the many uses for, and the potential good that video conferencing and collaboration can produce in the academic environment. Shortly there after, my good friend and colleague, John Drummond, published a post about many of the technology solutions we have […]

Student Perspectives on W&M’s First Online Courses

Online Pilot 1

This summer Randy Coleman (biochemstry) and Till Schreiber (macroeconomics) taught William & Mary’s first fully online summer courses in the Arts & Sciences. Once the courses were completed and grades were posted, we sent out a student satisfaction survey to all 22 students who completed the courses. We had twelve students complete the survey (a […]

Reflections on a Fireside Chat: “Managing” Versus “Teaching” the Online Course

campfire

This past weekend, I had an interesting conversation about e-learning while sitting on a mountaintop, huddled around a campfire in the dark. (I promise, dear reader, that I won’t try to make a metaphor out of that.) I was having this conversation with an old friend from my undergraduate days who teaches history at a […]

7 Tips for Giving Tests in Blackboard

W&M’s Blackboard system is available 99.98% of the time. While that’s a comforting statistic, it doesn’t help when you’ve scheduled a critical test and the system experiences issues. Thankfully, there are a few things you can do to make sure Blackboard tests go smoothly. 1. Give a Practice Test This will ensure that your students […]

Opening up the Web for Students and Faculty

Domain

Last fall, our neighbors just two and a half hours to the north at the University of Mary Washington launched an eye-opening program for their students, faculty, and staff. It is a service to allow users to register an Internet domain and house it on internal servers, called A Domain of One’s Own. The name […]

Doing E-Learning the W&M Way

About this time last year, William & Mary was touted as the best school in the nation for undergraduate teaching. Having sent out several E-Learning Development Kits into the wild over the spring and summer, I’ve gotten more than the usual taste of why, and how, our faculty achieved that reputation. This Summer W&M Offered Our […]

How to Effectively Use Blogging in Your Course

Title: Blogging Street Cred
Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/wakingtiger/3156791845/

If you have read any or all of my previous posts, you may have picked up on the fact that I tend to stray a bit from the typical Academic Technology Blog contribution tactic that many of my colleagues take. Sometimes I still find myself seeking to take the student role here at the College, […]

Pioneering W&M’s First Fully Online Classes

Prof. Coleman's online lecture on Metabolism.

William & Mary’s College of Arts and Sciences quietly crossed into a new era at the start of the second summer term with the launch of two fully online classes. Don’t be surprised if you missed it; the two pilot classes weren’t advertised or formally announced. How It Started Meetings began last December, and continued […]

SCORM und Drang, or, Testing out Some E-Learning “Objects”

This is not a SCORM, but it does do a good job saving student answers. The pencil and paper method, however, cannot grade exams for you.

The other week I was thinking about little projects to test out on the e-learning development kits, and I hit upon the idea of teaching myself how to create interactive content in Camtasia Studio. After watching the how-to video on Camtasia’s website (go figure — most of the help for Camtasia is developed in Camtasia, […]

Reflections on W&M’s myNotebook Program Ten Years Later

Geology 110 students using their laptop computers and LectureTools during class. I’m arm-waving at the front of the class. So who is on Facebook and who is checking their email? Photo by Pablo Yanez.

William & Mary announced its myNotebook initiative nearly ten years ago. Our effort was by no means revolutionary (as Wake Forest University’s ThinkPad Project began a decade earlier in 1996), rather it was meant to capitalize on the boom of mobile computing that was already changing how students interacted with technology on a day to […]