How to Make an Academic GIF from Video

The preview for my GIF! Aw, it looks nice!

Last time I wrote about how to make a GIF using still images, and related some reasons why you might want to learn how to make GIFs as an academic. Today I’ll teach you how to make a GIF using video, using my favorite GIF-making application, GIF Brewery. Why Make a GIF with Video? If […]

How to Make a GIF Part 1, Using Still Images

upside-down-above-earth

GIFs are an ubiquitous part of today’s Internet, and I know that I myself can’t remember seeing one for the first time. But, just in case you don’t know what one is, it’s an image format (like JPEG) but one that can include several images that change over time, sometimes quickly and sometimes slowly — […]

Opening up the Web for Students and Faculty

Domain

Last fall, our neighbors just two and a half hours to the north at the University of Mary Washington launched an eye-opening program for their students, faculty, and staff. It is a service to allow users to register an Internet domain and house it on internal servers, called A Domain of One’s Own. The name […]

More on Web-Friendly Mapping: Google Maps vs. Google Sheets

old-world-map

In my last post I discussed some of the new features and cool possibilities of Google Maps for the humanities at the College. After writing that post, I’ve been obsessing just a bit on the various Web-friendly ways to present map data to an academic community, and I’ve struck on another interesting option in case Google Maps […]

Project Ideas for Google Maps and the Humanities

WM-google-maps

Google Maps’s newest iteration attempts to combine qualitative and quantitative data into easy to build and manipulate maps. While faculty and students in the sciences and social sciences have been using quantitative data sets in teaching and research for a long time, the impulse to use interactive maps has not quite caught on with too […]

Basic Skills for the Information Age: Ideas from the Community College Circuit

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In April, I attended the Council for the Study of Community Colleges’ annual meeting in Washington, D.C. Part of my work there involved co-organizing a roundtable session around the idea of digital literacies in community colleges. Since then, I have published a summary of the session here. Defining Digital Literacy One of our biggest challenges […]

Mozilla Webmaker Part 3: Making and Using Web Projects

Some of the projects available on Mozilla Webmaker.

Mozilla, the software community that produces free Web browser Firefox has a pretty cool new(ish) website, Mozilla Webmaker. It has a collection of tools and resources, including an entire section geared towards education, meant to help people become more Web-literate. This is part three of my three-part series on Mozilla Webmaker, and in it I’ll talk […]

Mozilla Webmaker Part 2: Web Tools

popcorn-example-featured

Mozilla, the software community that produces free Web browser Firefox has a pretty cool new(ish) website, Mozilla Webmaker. In the last post in this series on Mozilla Webmaker, I went over some reasons why you might want to use Webmaker for a class assignment. In this post, I’ll cover a few of the nifty Mozilla tools available. Next week, in the final post in this series, I’ll talk about some of the project assignments available and how to go about making your own.

Mozilla Webmaker Part 1: Easily Teach (and Learn) Web Skills

Image courtesy of Flickr user Joe Mabel.

Mozilla, the software community that produces free Web browser Firefox, has a useful new website, Mozilla Webmaker. It has a collection of tools and resources, including an entire section geared towards teaching. Users of the site can create their own projects and post them on the site, remix existing projects, or are free to simply use existing projects. In this post, part one of my Mozilla Webmaker series, I’ll explain why you might want to think about assigning a Web-based project that involves coding or other content creation skills, and explain why Mozilla Webmaker is a great option for instructors.

The W&M-China Initiative: Digital Learning in Cross-Cultural Pedagogy

Skyping between W&M and Beijing Normal University students.

In this guest post by Professor Emily Wilcox, she talks about some of the exciting courses that are part of the grant project W&M-China Initiative for Film and New Media. This project hopes to explore how digital tools can help center teaching and learning on cross-cultural exchanges.