Using Computers for Teaching, 1967 to 2013

This is an image from the Life magazine article "The Computer as a Tutor." The original caption reads, "The sight of a small pupil ornamented like a pilot is rare, but may be common someday."

Teaching and learning with computers has been going on since at least the 1960s, and Stanford professors Pat Suppes and Dick Atkinson used computers in a California elementary school classroom to help students learn at their own pace. Their experiment, as outlined in a 1967 Life magazine article, shows that much of how we think about technology in education has stayed the same.

Academic Technology Links for June 28, 2013

Approved Links

The links this week include WYSIWYG editors, courses and resources for courses available online, and a critique of providing iPads for students. Enjoy!

Academic Technology Links for June 21, 2013

Approved Links

The links this week include two talks about technology, an upcoming conference in Richmond about higher ed and technology, and some tips for using an RSS feed. Enjoy!

Online Assignments and Student Privacy

Keeping an online course space private is one option, but it may undermine some of your teaching objectives.

The more that instructors incorporate online writing assignments into their courses, the more we need to think about the issues surrounding student-produced Web content. One of these issues is that of ensuring students’ privacy online while having them produce public-facing online work. So, what exactly is the concern for student-produced Web projects, and what can we do as instructors to protect our students’ privacy?

Academic Technology Links for June 14, 2013

Approved Links

The links this week include MOOCs (of course!), e-textbook usage, and Open Badges. Enjoy!

Finding Images for Your Web Content

flasks-loc

If you’ve ever created a website or written a blog post, you’ve probably thought about adding images to your site. But where do you find images that are safe to use without having to worry about copyright violations?

Academic Technology Links for June 7, 2013

Approved Links

The links this week include a reference for open source licenses, a new online course platform, MOOC student retention and the notion of “open” courses, and the (sometimes) rocky relationships between IT and higher ed. Enjoy!

Academic Technology Links for May 31, 2013

Approved Links

The links this week include MOOC news, Wikipedia edit-a-thons, and flipped classroom tips from a biology professor. Enjoy!

Improving My Online Security with 1Password

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“Have you ever forgotten your password?” password manager 1Password’s website asks. “Why yes,” you say, because of course the answer is yes — if you’ve ever changed a password, had multiple passwords like a good citizen concerned about security, or, really, used a computer in the past 10 years — you’ve probably forgotten a password at some point. Well, 1Password promises to help you out with that. I decided to give it a try due to John’s post about passwords, and Evan’s comment recommending 1Password, and it did indeed help me out.

Academic Technology Links for May 24, 2013

Approved Links

The links this week include iPads for learning, a critique of digital humanities, Google+’s visual recognition search, and blogging and grad school. Enjoy!