Author Archive: Kim Mann

About Kim Mann

Kim Mann is the editor and a writer for the Academic Technology Blog. She earned her BA in English from the University of Minnesota in 2003 and her MA in American Studies from William & Mary in 2009, and her PhD in American Studies at the College in 2014. Her research is on technology, the interface, and the body in mid-twentieth century science fiction.

How to Make an Academic GIF from Video

The preview for my GIF! Aw, it looks nice!

Last time I wrote about how to make a GIF using still images, and related some reasons why you might want to learn how to make GIFs as an academic. Today I’ll teach you how to make a GIF using video, using my favorite GIF-making application, GIF Brewery. Why Make a GIF with Video? If […]

How to Make a GIF Part 1, Using Still Images


GIFs are an ubiquitous part of today’s Internet, and I know that I myself can’t remember seeing one for the first time. But, just in case you don’t know what one is, it’s an image format (like JPEG) but one that can include several images that change over time, sometimes quickly and sometimes slowly — […]

A Brief Guide to Basic Technology Planning for Oral History Projects

Using audio only.

Over the past few months, I’ve been working with some folks on planning an oral history project. In doing that planning, I realized that there are many decisions to make about technology before even embarking on any of the interviews themselves. Whether your oral history project is one that you are doing yourself for your […]

Sorting out Your Dissertation’s Electronic Publishing Options


Not so long ago I defended my doctoral dissertation (hooray!) and readied copies of my manuscript for the College. I had reviewed the requirements the few weeks prior to preparing my manuscript so that I could be ready to turn it in soon after I defended. I went to turn in my copies the morning […]

Tips for Managing Laptops in the Classroom

Students looking very attentive to their work in the pre-laptop era.

News flash: Student laptops and phones can be annoying in the college classroom. Old news, right? But still news that instructors have to deal with more and more. We can ban devices, allow them, or figure out something in between — there’s no shortage of advice and policies in managing their use. Over the past […]

The Provost’s E-Learning Committee at W&M Needs Your Input!

The following is a message from the Provost’s E-Learning Committee at W&M — they’re hoping for some input from W&M faculty about what kinds of e-learning activities you all are engaged in. Without further adieu, here is his message: The W&M E-Learning Committee is developing a database of faculty using various e-learning methods in their […]

Second Annual W&M Teaching & Technology Expo


The second annual W&M Teaching & Technology Expo is just around the corner! Last year’s open-house showcase of educational technologies was a huge success, so come join us for this year’s event! All W&M faculty and staff are invited to join us again this year for an exciting opportunity to connect with faculty and technical […]

Upcoming Blackboard Workshops

April Lawrence, academic technologist for the School of Education, and Rachel Kleinsorge, our resident Blackboard expert, will be hosting a pair of Blackboard classes to help professors use the new Blackboard tools. The workshops will take place from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., on Monday, January 13, 2014, at the School of Education and Tuesday, […]

Five Tips for Using Skype and Google Hangout for Meetings

This image shows a comparison of different ISOs from a digital camera. Notice the additional noise in the bottom image? This is due to settings on the camera that aren't allowing enough light to enter the lens. [Image source.]

I recently moved to the opposite coast from W&M, and used the opportunity to learn how to use both Skype and Google Hangout for meetings with folks still in Virginia. I’ve used both platforms over the past few months, and I’m here to share my own quick tips for getting the most out of video […]

Paperless Grading: Getting Electronic Feedback on Your Work

Here's where I put all my dissertation documents in Dropbox for my committee to read.  This means that we all share the most updated versions of these documents, which is really handy.

With increasing numbers of faculty using forms of paperless commenting on student work, we’ve published several posts here on the Academic Technology Blog about doing electronic grading. I’ve used PDF editors and MS Word comments to paperlessly grade student work before, and would never go back to grading hard copies of papers. But, now that […]